Apr 302014
 

medicEver since my brother joined the Military I’ve thought that could be a potentially good way to push cryonics. The Military is already well-known for forcing technological change, but it’s less known that the Military’s effort to reduce loss of fighting men to Syphilis (as well as other STIs) was a contributor to the social acceptance of condoms, which had previously been shunned. The social changes resulting from that campaign, especially in the wake of WWII, are sometimes cited as a precursor to the sexual revolution.

People don’t seem to care that much when an old person dies of natural causes, which is the case for most cryo. A young, attractive corpse gathers enough sympathy and attention to get crowd-sourced funding. The Military produces a much higher-than-average number of young, tragic deaths. A fair percentage of them leave the brain intact. It shouldn’t be that hard of a case to make that since the Military is the reason that these young people are losing their lives, it has a duty to give them the best chance at getting their lives back.

Difficulty of engineering a moderately-sided canister that can be fitted over the head of a dead soldier and automatically sever and preserve it (obviously opt-in only)? Probably well within DARPA resources. A decade of this being a standard option for military personnel would do wonders to ease social acceptability, no? A family that has a son/brother in cryo now has emotional motivation to consider that it just might, maybe, work some day in the future.

Unfortunately I’m currently estranged from my brother, and I don’t think he’d be willing to pursue this with me even if we were on good terms. But maybe some day this could be an avenue of attack for someone with military connections/knowledge.

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